Japanese knotweed is the name of terror for every gardener. Once this predator starts hunting, there is very less chance to stop it. Read this article to know about this plant.Visit this site for japanese knotweed control.

japanese knotweed controlA little history

This incredible plant was originally present in its original environment in Japan. The desire for collections of many adventurers hundreds of years ago meant that some species were imported and planted in many countries before even worrying about the possible consequences. This happened in 1840 when a Bavarian doctor exported it from Japan. Click here for japanese knotweed control.

Then, it was taken here and there by certain gardeners who found it attractive, who also allowed them to be invaded. Today, it colonizes virtually the entire world mainly with the help of rivers, birds or human activities.

Methods of colonization

To our great happiness, the seeds produced by knotweed in France are almost all sterile (except for sachalinensis), making it impossible to propagate by sowing. But it is not because it does not resent that its spread is slow, quite the contrary!

In a given space, the knotweed implants itself in two stages. At first on all the cleared zones as well as the wastelands then in a second time in already occupied zones like the forests or the agricultural fields.

The three main methods of invasion

– By cutting and re-rooting stems

In this situation, note that a single piece of stem can quickly become rooted in another place and that is why the grinding of the plant is not recommended.

– By division of rhizomes acting as underground stems

In this situation, note that a single piece of stem can quickly become rooted in another place and that is why the grinding of the plant is not recommended.

– By division of rhizomes acting as underground stems

In this case, a single fragment of one centimeter allows the creation of a new specimen.

Present mainly along rivers, fragments of rhizomes can be moved through the current, allowing it to go further root.

– By eliminating competition

Indeed, Japanese knotweed is also capable of emitting toxic substances for the roots of other plants directly into the soil, thus making any competition with it impossible. The density of its foliage also masks the light on the ground with great efficiency, again preventing the growth of any other lower plant or just young. Finally, the rhizomes of knotweed are so invasive that in one sqm of invaded soil, you can find more than 100 m of rhizomes or about 25 kg. Per hectare, about 29 tons of roots and stems combined in the case of a good invasion!